Next?!?

28 03 2014

Here I go, blogging on a stupid iPhone. But I’ll do it, this once. I’m feeling a strong pull to get some things out of my heart and into the world. (Maybe one of you blessed readers will send me a pretty computer in the mail to replace the one that a toddler decided to explore and destroy, thus allowing me to share with you in a manner that doesn’t drive me crazy from typing on a phone screen. A phone, people!)

I’m at a pinnacle of sorts. On an edge. A razor’s sharp, shiny edge. One wrong move and I fall hard. Or slice myself right down the middle, from crotch to head? Maybe that.

I came home from the hospital again seven days ago from yet another week-long stay. I’ve stopped writing about my attacks because I doubt they’re interesting to anyone anymore, yeah? But for those of you keeping track, it was a grand total of something like 7 visits (totaling about 48 days or so?) in 2013, and 4 so far for 2014. Each incident brings a new complication, becomes a little harder to treat, requires more intervention. I lose energy, momentum, will, dignity, modesty each time. My body doesn’t feel like mine anymore. There are no more private parts. After as many catheters, monitors, enemas, scopes, and cameras as I’ve had stuck in and on my body, there is just no room for propriety any longer.

I’ve gone through being unresponsive with only 4-6 breaths per minute, prompting the rapid response team to race to my bedside. I’ve laid perfectly still and remained calm while they told me they were about to administer a drug to stop my heart, in the hopes of resetting it and breaking it from the pattern of supra-ventricular tachycardia it was stubbornly racing through. (Feeling your heart straight-up stop is terrifying and exhilarating and I’m almost inclined to recommend it.) I’ve experienced moments of searing nerve pain so excruciating that all I can do is beg the nurse to rip all the clothes off my body, so I squat on the bed naked, minimizing anything coming into contact with my skin, and cry, because no medications stop nerve pain. I’ve watched blood splatter out of my mouth during moments of violent hurling, from the gashes burned into my esophageal track after such constant illness. I’ve had two ports yanked out, and three put in, because after several months of hemetin and dextrose they gunk up and stop working, essentially threatening my dripped-in promise of life.

And these attacks have, for the most, fallen into a neat little pattern. About four days before my period is to start, I usually feel the first twinges of pain. Usually less than 48 hours from that point, I’m hooked up to my machines and pumps and I’m struggling to post squinty smiley pictures on social media to assure everyone I’m fine.

Seeing as the attacks are following such a tidy calendar, the obvious (to many) conclusion is to eliminate that calendar. Take away my cycle. Treat me with hormones. I started talks with one of my doctors, who happens to be a smart, quiet, funny researcher from NIH for whom I have a great deal of respect and fondness, about just this a couple of months ago. In my mind, we were talking about birth control pills (or a shot or IUD or something,) to stop Lady Flo in her tracks. But In his mind, we were not discussing birth control at all.

We were discussing menopause.

Dr. NIH wants to give me a hormonal therapy that will send me into post-menopausal hormone levels. He dropped a few printed pages of a study done on the treatment for AIP, and said “This is what we’ll do. Find a gynecologist to work with and we’ll get stsrted.”

Just like that.

As though facing menopause at 33 is something I shouldn’t take issue with. Sure! Let’s shut the ovaries down! Dry that silly uterus up! Gain weight! Get hot flashes and mood swings! Kill what libido remains after 5 years of chronic illness! Make sex painful and difficult! Get wrinkles and saggy parts! Turn old, now!

Of course it may not be quite that extreme. And I don’t mean to be offensive to women who are menopausal! (I’m being hyperbolic here because I’m sort of panicking, obvi.) I’m not one to say that I’m dreading menopause, WHENEVER THAT MAY NATURALLY HAPPEN.

But y’all. I’m 33. I’m not 100% sure I’m done with my baby making! I’m feeling (other than sick and exhausted and beat-down,) pretty bangin and confident, actually. I’d like to sit in this third-life space for a while, experience my thirties as a 30-something year old. Not having to worry about significantly increased risks of lady-cancers (I already have a greatly increased risk of liver cancer to work with,) with crazy-times mood swings and even less energy that I have now.

Maybe I’m making too big a deal of it .

Maybe I should do it and shut up .

Maybe I can’t.

This has literally stopped me in my tracks. Reading through the study has not encouraged me, with only about a 25% rate of good results, out of only FOURTEEN WOMEN , one of whom died… But if I don’t, then I am selfishly robbing my family of the opportunity to not lose their mother/wife/teacher/housekeeper/meal-maker/laundry-doer monthly to serious illness and recovery.

I don’t know what to do. Obviously I have more research to sift through, but it’s hard to come by, and no clear answers are going to glare at me from the pages of study summaries . I have a strong feeling that my decision will ultimately be made from my gut. The one that bleeds when it’s upset with me. My heart. My silly heart that beats too fast and too hard and needs round- the- clock monitoring at times.

This is the beginning of the end of living in denial for me.

You see, I truly have been in denial since I was diagnosed. You may not think I have, but I have. Each time I experience an attack , I think it’s the last (you’d really think I’d have caught on after the 12th or so hospitalization…) And I have a deeply buried belief that I am responsible for being ill, that my symptoms are not some disease that I innocently inherited through no fault of my own, but that are manifestations of my own poor decisions and sins. And that porphyria wouldn’t rule my life if only I didn’t let it.

It’s time to face my life head-on now. Either find a way to live peacefully with the disease , or find the fortitude (and energy and money) to fight the disease. I think there are merits in both. Validity in wanting rest and surrender and passivity, and validity in not wanting to roll over and settle for this as a way of life.

Which way will I go?

It’s time to make some choices.

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